Friends of Blackhill and Morialta Parks Inc

Spectacular scenery, conservation of natural lands, along with our indigenous flora and fauna, combine in Black Hill, Morialta and Horsnell Gully Conservation Parks. They also provide opportunities in an outdoor setting for recreation for park visitors. Together they form a major open space along the foothills that is the Adelaide Hills Face Zone.

Our Objectives

  • To provide voluntary assistance to the National Parks and Wildlife Service.
  • Publicise the parks and raise funds for specific projects.
  • To provide for the enjoyment of members, staff and the public and to stimulate public awareness for our National Parks and the state's Flora and Fauna.
  • To develop improved attitudes in the community towards outdoor recreation and the preservation of our natural environment.
  • To co-operate with others or organisations having similar interests.
  • We have project sites in Black Hill, Morialta and Horsnell Gully Conservation Parks

About the Parks

Backdrop to the Adelaide Plains

Spectacular scenery, conservation of natural lands, along with our indigenous flora and fauna, combine in Black Hill, Morialta and Horsnell Gully Conservation Parks. They also provide opportunities in an outdoor setting for recreation for park visitors. Together they form a major open space along the foothills that is the Adelaide Hills Face Zone.

Black Hill Conservation Park

Black Hill Conservation Park rises distinctly from the Adelaide Plains, its darkly wooded contours standing boldly behind the north-eastern suburbs. The park protects 684 ha (Draft Morialta and Black Hill Conservation Parks Management Plans 1999) of remnant vegetation of various kinds.
The park supports an intricate variety of plants, from the giant river red gums which stand in the rich cool valleys, to the low heath plants that hug the hillsides and rugged tops. Common amongst the heaths are the low sheoaks (Allocasuarina muellerina) which give Black Hill its name. Their foliage gradually matures to a dark, almost black colour as summer progresses.
Flood Damage November 2005
In November 2005, heavy rain caused localised flooding in Adelaide. Black Hill and Morialta Conservation Parks were also affected, with the main valley in Morialta closing, and a landslide in Black Hill Conservation Park. The Friends recommend you keep well clear of damaged paths and infrastructure for your own safety. To view commentary and photographs of the landslide at the top of Ghost Tree Gully in Black Hill Conservation Park, visit this web site set up by one of our members (this page will open in a new window)
How do you get there?
The park has entrances on
Gorge Road, Joann Street, Everest Avenue, Bradbrook Road, Addison Avenue, Montacute Road.
There is drinking water near the entrance of the Wildflower Garden, currently there are toilets at the back of the building at Addison Ave Athelstone, however there are no other facilities in the immediate vicinity.
 
Horsnell Gully
How do you get there?
Coming from Adelaide, head out of the city on Magill Road.
At the end of Magill Road go straight on, along the Old Norton Summit Road.After a few kilometres, there is a road to the right called "Horsnell Gully Road", this road is also used for access to the adjacent quarry. Just before you reach the quarry, is a small track to the right, with the sign pictured right. A short distance from the entrance is a car park.
Horsnell Gully has historic elements of early settlement clearly visible, including exotic trees and old ruins.
Morialta Conservation Park
About Morialta Conservation Park
The park protects 533 ha (Draft Morialta and Black Hill Conservation Parks Management Plans 1999) of remnant vegetation of various kinds. It is home to First, Second and Third Falls and many plant and animal species of conservation significance.
In 1915 Morialta was proclaimed a National Pleasure Resort following the donation by John Smith Reid of 218 ha of land in 1913.
How do you get there?
The main entrance to the park is on Morialta Road.
The Falls
Probably the greatest visitor attractions to the Park, are the waterfalls.
The First Falls are readily accessible, with easy walking on well made paths. Parking for a five dollar fee is available close to the walking track. The parking fee is collected by DEWNR, the proceeds of which are contributed to the maintenance of the Park.
Although there are significant weed problems in the main valley, you will notice Leptospermum lanigerum has an affinity with the water course. There are also various sedges and rushes that live in and near the water. Be careful not to mistake the native raspberry for the invasive blackberry that also grows along the creek. You are also likely to see Blue Wrens, and hear a variety of frogs in the creek. If you look closely into the water, you may see small fish or yabbies. The Yellow-footed Antechinus has been seen in this area.


Join Us Now

Become a member

Contact Details

Secretary: John Fleming

Email: president@fobhm.org

Phone: 8336 5275


Postal Address:

88 Addison Avenue, Athelstone 5076